Koji Urehara, Yu Darvish and Masahiro Tanaka: 2014 All Stars

Uehara and Darvish at 2014 All Star

Uehara and Darvish at 2014 pre-All Star Game practice.

This year, even though one of them was on DL, was the third time in the MLB history three Japanese players were selected on MLB All Star team. Yu Darvish and Masahiro Tanaka was selected and Koji Uehara filled in the roster for injured Tanaka (though I need to clarify that it had nothing to do with Japanese player replacing a Japanese player, Uehara was the next most qualified player to be on the AS when Tanaka got hurt. Some Japanese report emphasized this as if Uehara “filled-in” for Tanaka…)

According to Rangers’ Press Release Darvish has been selected to the All-Star team in each of his three major league seasons. This makes him just the second A.L., pitcher to ever be an All-Star in as many as his first three big league campaigns (rookie status in year one). The other was Jonathan Papelbon, who was an All-Star in his first four years with Boston from 2006-09. Only three other major league pitchers have ever been All-Stars in at least their first three seasons after not making their ML debuts until first year of that span: 7 Tom Seaver, Mets (1967-73); 3 Don Newcombe, Dodgers (1949-51); 3 Dwight Gooden, Mets (1984-86).

Darvish pitched a perfect third inning (Puig K, Tulowitzki L7, Goldschmidt L4), and Uehara came in in the top 6th, with two outs, two run lead and runner on the third. Koji struck out Reds’ Devin Mesoraco with three pitches (swinging). Though this was Darvish’s third selection, this was his All-Star Game debut.

Here is a good piece on Uehara written by Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe. A four-time All Star Ian Kinsler thinks “he’s one of the most underrated players around.” A quote from O’s Adam Jones, Koji’s former-teammate, about sums it up: “I faced him when we were in Boston and he struck me out. I had three fastballs to hit and I still I can’t believe I didn’t absolutely annihilate one.”

If you haven’t, read an Excellent piece on Masahiro Tanaka by New York Times’ Barry Bearak.

List of 12 Japanese players that made MLB All Star team

(Updated July 8, 2014)

  1. Hideo Nomo (Los Angeles Dodgers): 1995
  2. Ichiro Suzuki (Seattle Mariners): Ten times – 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
  3. Kazuhiro Sasaki (Seattle Mariners): Twice – 2001, 2002
  4. Hideki Matsui (New York Yankees): Twice – 2003, 2004
  5. Shigetoshi Hasegawa (Seattle Mariners): 2003
  6. Takashi Saito (Los Angeles Dodgers): 2007
  7. Hideki Okajima (Boston Red Sox): 2007
  8. Kosuke Fukudome (Chicago Cubs): 2008
  9. Yu Darvish (Texas Rangers): Three times – 2012, 2013, 2014
  10. Hisashi Iwakuma (Seattle Mariners): 2013
  11. Masahiro Tanaka: 2014
  12. Koji Ueahaea: 2014

Same list by year:

  • 1995: 1 Nomo
  • 1996: 0
  • 1997: 0
  • 1998: 0
  • 1999: 0
  • 2000: 0
  • 2001: 2 Ichiro Sasaki
  • 2002: 2 Ichiro Sasaki
  • 2003: 3 Ichiro Matsui Hasegawa
  • 2004: 2 Ichiro Matsui
  • 2005: 1 Ichiro
  • 2006: 1 Ichiro
  • 2007: 3 Ichiro Saito Okajima
  • 2008: 2 Ichiro Fukudome
  • 2009: 1 Ichiro
  • 2010: 0
  • 2011: 0
  • 2012: 1 Darvish
  • 2013: 2 Darvish Iwakuma
  • 2014: 3 Darvish Tanaka Uehara
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The other side of story: Horace Wilson who introduced baseball in Japan

Filling this under interesting and odd/strange story related to Japanese baseball.

Horace Wilson -- the one who introduced baseball to japan.

Horace Wilson — the one who introduced baseball to japan.

The name Horace Wilson is well-known in Japan. I can confirm that it is true — I even knew his name. “The one who taught us baseball,” Japanese say. It’s an answer to a trivia question, and in first sentence in the “History of Baseball In Japan“. He has a plaque at Japanese Baseball Hall of Fame at Tokyo Dome. I seem to recall seeing that in person last time I visited there in 2008.

He is originally from Maine, and there was an interesting report on Boston’s WBUR, about his decedents, who didn’t know anything about what he did in Japan. The reporter, Theo Balcomb, is a family member.

Japanese Baseball Began On My Family’s Farm In Maine

After Horace Wilson left the farm in Maine and fought in the Civil War, he traveled to Japan in 1871 and became a teacher. He then taught at what would become Tokyo University. There, he introduced to the students the game of baseball. This is my own opinion, but I think the duel between a pitcher and a batter, even though this is a team game played between teams, had appealed to the Japanese “samurai” style — I think of the duel between Musashi Miyamoto and Kojiro Sasaki on Ganryujima in the early 1600′s. but I digress.

I think it is fascinating that his family was completely unaware until the Japanese historian contacted them. I guess Horace never bothered to tell the family, or perhaps he didn’t think much of it then — who could imagine that the baseball will be cultivated in Japan over hundred years, through World Wars, and produce likes of Ichiro Suzuki and two World Baseball Classic Titles. Whatever the reason, this is a very unique story, and worth a read/listen.

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John Farrell on Masahiro Tanaka and challenges for Japanese players

farrell-matsuzaka

John Farrell worked closely with Daisuke Matsuzaka on his transition to American style of baseball

World Series Champion Boston Red Sox’s manager, John Farrell took questions from audience at Boston Chapter of Society of American Baseball Research (SABR) meeting at the Baseball Tavern in Boston, January 20, 2014. He was very good, very articulate, very knowledgeable, but sincere and respectful, I could see why players and media likes him. I was there in the audience and was able to ask Farrel a question (around 19:10). He was with Daisuke Matsuzka as the pitching coach of the Boston Red Sox from 2007 to 2010. He experienced a Japanese pitcher’s transition to MLB first hand. I asked him, what would it take for Masahiro Tanaka to be successfull in US?

Here is Farrell’s answer:

There are number of things that they are going to encounter here for the first time.
In Japan there is one time zone, here, we are transitioning three.
You got a composition of the mound. In Japan, it is sand-based and your feet slide a little bit, as supposed to clay mound here. It puts more stress on lower half, they are going to have to condition themselves physically for that.
The baseball is completely different. The surface of the Japanese baseball is tacky, it’s sticky. Here, it is rubbed up with mud, there is a film to it and it’s much more slippery.
The strength of the line up that they are going to face in States versus the line up in Japan, not being condescending in anyway, but there is a difference.
The strike zone, I think here, it can be smaller more consistently.
And the fact is that they go from pitching once a week, to now every five days. So there are number of things that is challenging and It will be interesting to see how Tanaka transitions.

But in terms of overall game execution, the ability to use the fastball here in the States, I think, is much more important than it may be in Japan. Just that being different styles of pitching. Now there is a willingness to use the whole count there where they may throw a 2-1 breaking ball and pitch to the full count little bit more than we will. There is less strictness for pitch counts there. Largely because there is more recovery time, you are pitching every 7 days versus every 5th day. There are number of things that will challenge him regardless of the talent that he comes here with.

It is very interesting. Listing to the whole conversation by poressing the play button on the embeded player. People also asked him about Koji Uehara.

As I write this post, there is a news that Masahiro Tanaka signed a seven year, $155 million contract with the New York Yankees. Tanaka will be the 7th Japanese Yankee, following Hideki Irabu, Hideki Matsui, Kei Ihawa, Hiroki Kuroda and Ichiro Suzuki. Yankees also have a prospect in Gosuke Katoh who was the 66th pick of the 2013 First-Year Player Draft.

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Tomohiro Anraku and why Japanese pitchers throws so many pitches

tomohiro-anraku-saibi

Saibi High School ace, Tomohiro Anraku

A friend of mine forwarded me this amazing, fascinating, very nicely done story about Japanese baseball in ESPN The Magazine: When 772 pitches isn’t enough by By Chris Jones.

The story is about a Japanese high school pitcher named Tomohiro Anraku, who threw 772 pitches in a 2013 spring tournament, and gave up 9 runs to lose the Koshien Final. Throwing a lot of pitches like that are somewhat accepted in Japan. Daisuke Matsuzaka threw 767 pitches in six games in 1998 (17 inning/250 pitch complete game quarter-final; releaf apprance in semi-final; and complete game no-hitter in the final) and Yu Darvish, who has a father who is said to be protective, even threw 505 pitches in five games in 2003.

But this description below is what is fascinating. It goes into “why” a little more. Japanese sees the baseball in very different way than how Americans may view it. It is very Robert Whiting-esque, one of my favorite writer about Japanese baseball. (Japanese characters below are added by me.)

[In Japan, there are] 2,000 years of history and nearly as many traditions. One of those traditions is called nagekomi (in Japanese: 投げ込み). In America, nagekomi, like throwing 772 pitches in a single tournament, would be considered child abuse. Scientists would debunk it, and surgeons would decry it. But in Japan, nagekomi is important. It’s maybe even essential. It is many things all at once, but mostly it is an exercise in remembering, and it is beautiful.

It was born, like so much else that matters in Japan, of Buddhism, of martial arts, of bushido (武士道)– of the samurai spirit. At its purest, nagekomi is the repetition of a simple physical task beyond the point of exhaustion. It is the ceaseless completion of an exercise until you collapse. Baseball stuck so well here partly because in its routines, in its timelessness and pseudo-meditation, it might have been Japanese: a game of self-control, of precision, of craft. It also, conveniently, lent itself well to nagekomi. Baseball, as witnessed from a certain vantage point, could seem designed expressly to break you.

Take the infamous 1,000 Fungo Drill (千本ノック). For one day at Japanese spring training, professional players take a deep breath and begin fielding grounders. At first, fielding grounders is largely a mental exercise. You think about the process, about the careful placement of your feet, hands and head. Left. Right. Left. Right. After a few hundred grounders, however, your brain will pack up and leave town for the beach. Your body will start acting automatically, without central systemic guidance, and in turn a mental exercise will become a more purely physical one. Left, right, left, right. But after another few hundred grounders, your body too will stop working the way it normally might. It is no longer yours, and you are no longer you. Now you will have reached that very particular departure lounge where what was once a physical exercise becomes spiritual. Now it’s your soul (魂) at work. Leftrightleftright. And there is no axon or muscle fiber that remembers anything the way your soul remembers everything. That is the purpose of nagekomi: to open your soul as wide as a prairie, allowing it to swallow those secrets you have learned about yourself and lock them away inside the deepest parts of you, where they will survive long after your body dies. Nagekomi is that moment of clarity that comes in the last hundred yards of a marathon; it is that instant your throat closes and tears begin to run down your face. It is not a pursuit of a temporary, earthly glory. It is not gravity bound. Nagekomi is weightless, and it is forever.

Read the rest of story here.

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Koji Uehara’s consecutive perfect saves and his Japanese stats/background

koji-uehara-jim-davis-globe-2013-09-03

Photo by Jim Davis of the Boston Globe

(Note: stats are updated at the end of streak below)

Yu Darvish is leading MLB with 240 strikeouts as of today (that is now the most in a season by Japanese pitcher, with passed Hideo Nomo’s 236 in 1995) and Hisashi Iwakuma and Hiroki Kuroda are both having an excellent year. But another Japanese pitcher is having excellent season this year for the Boston Red Sox: Koji Uehara.

Koji Uehara pitched a perfect 9th inning Tuesday night (September 3, 2013) and Friday night (Sept. 5) to record his 17th and 18th save of the season. It was his 7th game in the row where he had perfect relief and he has retired his last 24 batters faced. Last hit against him came on August 17, Lyle Overbay of N.Y. Yankees double in the 9th, and he has been perfect since. According to Red Sox Game Notes, this (7 save tries) is now the longest streak of perfect save tries in Red Sox history, passing Jeff Russell (May 12 through June 13, 1993). He has been perfect in 16 of his 18 saves this year. That is amazing. He just makes it look easy.

On top of that, Uehara has not allowed a run for almost 2 full month. Last run against him came on July 6th against L.A. Angels. he has not allowed a run in his last 26.0 inning, which the longest scoreless streak of his career, including NPB. It is the longest streak by a Red Sox since Daniel Bard went 26.1 IP from May 27 through July 31, 2011.

Besides that, he is becoming one of the fan favorite in Boston, capturing Red Sox fans’ heart with his enthusiastic fist pumps and high fives after the save.

Ueahara was acutually recruited — and reportedly close to be sigining — by the then California Angels as a 19-year-old college student (Osaka University of Health and Sport Sciences) before going to be signed by Yomiuri Giants in 1998 draft (the same year Daisuke Matsuzaka was selected to go to Seibu Lions). He caught international scouts’ eyes in college with his success in international competitions. In 1997, as a Junior, he struck out 14 in U.S.-Japan 26th annual international collegiate friendly series. That same year, Japan stunned the world by winning 1997 Intercontinental Cup. They beat Cuba in the final, who had not lost an internantinal event for 15 years — 151 straight, since 1982. And guess who pitched that game? Koji Uehara. He started the game, went 5 1/3 inning with allowing just one solo home run to get a win.

The Yomiuri Giants had been scouting Uehara since his second year in college and even with “Daisuke Mania” that swpt Japan, they never wavered their faith in him. It was Uehara’s wish to be drafted by the Giants, and they did.

Uehara had a very successful career in Japanese baseball. Had Career ERA of 3.01 in the span of 10 seasons winning 112 games, while losing only 62. He was a closer in 2007, saved 32 games while posting 1.74 ERA.

Here are his Japanese numbers from Open source Japanese Baseball Database.

Season Fr Team Lg Age AP SCG RGF SIG EI SHO 0BB WI LO TI WL% SV SP HD HP IP BF AB BH HR SH SF BB IBB HBP SO WP BK RA ERA R/9 ER/9
1999 1 Giants CL 24 25 12 0 13 0 1 4 20 4 0 0.833 0 0 197.2 769 723 153 12 11 6 24 3 4 179 3 0 49 46 2.23 2.09
2000 1 Giants CL 25 20 6 0 14 0 1 2 9 7 0 0.563 0 0 131.0 519 485 112 20 9 2 22 1 1 126 1 0 53 52 3.64 3.57
2001 1 Giants CL 26 24 4 0 18 0 1 1 10 7 0 0.588 0 0 138.2 573 522 133 18 15 3 28 3 5 108 2 0 66 62 4.28 4.02
2002 1 Giants CL 27 26 8 0 18 1 3 4 17 5 0 0.773 0 0 204.0 808 761 173 18 16 2 23 3 6 182 2 0 65 59 2.87 2.60
2003 1 Giants CL 28 27 11 0 16 0 1 3 16 5 0 0.762 0 0 207.1 821 777 190 28 14 2 23 3 5 194 0 0 76 73 3.30 3.17
2004 1 Giants CL 29 22 2 0 20 0 0 0 13 5 0 0.722 0 0 163.0 637 600 135 24 6 3 23 0 5 153 1 0 54 47 2.98 2.60
2005 1 Giants CL 30 27 6 0 21 0 2 4 9 12 0 0.429 0 0 0 187.1 747 703 164 24 19 3 22 0 0 145 0 1 73 69 3.51 3.31
2006 1 Giants CL 31 24 5 0 19 0 0 3 8 9 0 0.471 0 0 168.1 673 631 157 24 15 5 21 3 1 151 0 1 67 60 3.58 3.21
2007 1 Giants CL 32 55 0 0 0 4 3 0.571 32 4 8 62.0 237 47 4 4 1 1 66 1 0 12 12 1.74 1.74
2008 1 Giants CL 33 26 2 0 0 6 5 0.545 1 5 7 89.2 370 90 11 16 1 0 72 0 0 43 38 4.32 3.81
10 seasons 276 56 0 139 1 9 21 112 62 0 0.644 33 0 9 15 1549.0 6154 5202 1354 183 105 26 206 18 28 1376 10 2 558 518 3.24 3.01

His career numbers in MLB

***

[UPDATE September 18]
Last night against the Baltimore Orioles, Koji Uehara’s streak came to an end, but what a streak. Following information is mostly from the Game Notes from last night. (link to pdf)

Uehara has retired each of his last 37 batters faced, which was the longest stretch of consecutive batters retired by a Red Sox pitcher in club history according to SABR (previously, 32 by Ellis Kinder in 1952 was the longest). It was just 4 shy of longest such stretch by a reliever in MLB history, longest was 41 batters by Bobby Jenks (White Sox) in 2007, and just 8 batters shy of the all-time MLB record (Mark Buehrle, 45 in 2009).

As for Japanese players, Uehara’s 37 passed previous longest by Hideo Nomo‘s 31 batters, set in 2001, also with the Boston Red Sox.

Uehara also had not allowed a run till last night, for his last 30.1 innings pitched. It is the longest scoreless streak in MLB this season (passing Colorado Rockirs Rex Brothers, 30.0 IP, April 10 – June27), the longest in a season in the AL in 5 years (OAK’s Brad Zeigler, 39.0 IP, in 2008), and the longest singleseason scoreless streak for a Sox reliever since Dick Radatz’s 33.0-inning stretch from May 13 through June 14, 1963.

It is the longest by Japanese players. Previsouly, Seattle Mariners’ Shigetoshi Hasegawa held the longest, going 28.2 IP without a run from June 3 to August 17 in 2003. Hasegawa went 25 games without being scored, Uehara passed it by going 27 games, beginning 7/9, the longest consecutive scoreless outings streak in the Red Sox history. The previous mark was Daniel Bard’s 25-game streak in 2011.

What is amazing about Koji Uehara is his ability to get people swing and miss on his split (or it was known as “fork ball” back in Japan, but most of Japanese article written online now refer to his pitch as “split,” “splitter” or “split finger fastball”)

Let’s take a look at Brooksbaseball.net, a wonderful tool for pitch f/x analysis by Dan Brooks and Harry Pavilidis. Look at the pitch breakdown this year. As of time of writing, he has 4 pitches, he mostly relyes on two, 4-seamer and splitter.

(Note: total number may be more. This is at time of writing. but you get the point.)

  • 432 four seam
  • 441 split
  • 3 curve
  • 49 cutter

And look at his Whif counts! That is number of swings and misses he gets on his pitches.

  • 60 four seam
  • 120 split (!)
  • 0 curve
  • 7 cutter

So more than 4 in 1 time, (whiff percentage: 27.2%) major leaguers are swinging and missing his splitter. That’s amaing.

That is deception at work. The batter think it is a fastball, and swing (they swing at 61% of his splitters, 50.23% 4-seam) and missing most of time. Here are the differences in his fastball and splitter.

Velocity: One thing that is unique about Uehara is his fast ball is not that fast. Unlike other closers, who are typically “flame throwers” or “fire baller”, his fast ball is only 89.94 miles an hour. But it is effective because his splitter is 81.71 m.p.h., or 8 miles an hour difference.

Movement: His fourseam fastball drops 5.4 inches (average), but splitter drops much more at 6.84 inches (average).

This works because his two pitches are almost identical to the batter, until it leaves his hand (different groip). Deception at work. His pitching form, his arm slot (or arm angle) and release point are very similar. Pitch f/x provide numbers for his release points. Here is the look at the vertical and horizontal release point data (where he release the ball). Almost identical. Amazing consistency.

  • fourseam: 6.10 vert -1.26 hori
  • splitter 6.04 vert -1.25 hori

Uehara has been perfect in 17 of 19 saves this year. The Red Sox have 10 games to play, and they are on the verge of clinching a spot in the post season for the first time since 2007. Magic number to clinch the AL East is 3. The Sox have not won division since 2007. Looking forward to seeing what Uehara does in the postseason.

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MLB Network has short segment on Masanori Murakami, 1964

murakami-news-1964

News clip about Murakami in 1964. (Screen capture of MLB Network video)

MLB Network produced this clip of Masanori Murakami in its “MLB Network Remembers” segment.

Murakami was part of a temporary prospect exchange program from Nankai Hawks with the San Francisco Giants, and called up to the majors on September 1, 1964.

His MLB Stats:

Year Age Tm W L W-L% ERA G GS GF CG SHO SV IP H R ER HR BB IBB SO HBP BK WP BF ERA+ WHIP H/9 HR/9 BB/9 SO/9 SO/BB
1964 20 SFG 1 0 1.000 1.80 9 0 5 0 0 1 15.0 8 3 3 1 1 0 15 0 1 0 53 202 0.600 4.8 0.6 0.6 9.0 15.00
1965 21 SFG 4 1 .800 3.75 45 1 16 0 0 8 74.1 57 31 31 9 22 5 85 3 0 3 304 97 1.063 6.9 1.1 2.7 10.3 3.86
2 Yrs 5 1 .833 3.43 54 1 21 0 0 9 89.1 65 34 34 10 23 5 100 3 1 3 357 106 0.985 6.5 1.0 2.3 10.1 4.35

Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table Generated 9/2/2013.

His Japanese stats after returning to Japan (and 3 games a year before). Despite his elbow injury, he had a good career.

Year Fr Tm Lg Age AP CG GF SIG EI SHO 0BB W L TI W-L% SV SP HD HP IP BF AB H HR SH SF BB IBB HBP SO WP BK R ER RA ERA
1963 9 Hawks PL 19 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -.— 2.0 10 8 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 4.50 4.50
1966 9 Hawks PL 22 46 0 13 2 0 0 0 6 4 0 0.600 96.1 387 341 80 10 10 3 25 1 8 66 1 0 34 33 3.18 3.08
1967 9 Hawks PL 23 41 0 8 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 0.750 80.1 340 300 72 11 4 3 26 0 7 60 2 0 36 36 4.03 4.03
1968 9 Hawks PL 24 40 9 11 10 0 1 1 18 4 1 0.818 177.2 718 653 141 18 11 4 40 3 10 90 1 0 54 47 2.74 2.38
1969 9 Hawks PL 25 31 3 10 11 0 0 1 7 9 1 0.438 119.0 513 462 139 19 11 5 32 1 3 47 0 0 64 60 4.84 4.54
1970 9 Hawks PL 26 32 9 3 15 0 2 2 11 11 0 0.500 191.1 791 715 167 18 8 2 52 2 14 75 1 0 79 69 3.72 3.25
1971 9 Hawks PL 27 38 13 5 18 0 0 0 14 15 1 0.483 234.2 992 888 233 36 16 9 63 3 16 78 0 0 122 107 4.68 4.10
1972 9 Hawks PL 28 33 6 1 13 0 1 1 11 9 0 0.550 147.1 652 569 156 20 13 4 46 0 20 57 3 1 79 70 4.83 4.28
1973 9 Hawks PL 29 23 0 9 8 0 0 0 2 4 1 0.333 65.2 295 253 75 8 7 3 25 0 7 27 1 0 42 38 5.76 5.21
1974 9 Hawks PL 30 10 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 0.333 0 24.2 89 79 13 1 4 0 3 0 3 10 0 0 7 5 2.55 1.82
1975 2 Tigers CL 31 18 0 7 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0.667 1 19.1 89 78 24 4 2 0 7 0 2 8 0 0 14 11 6.52 5.12
1976 11 Fighters PL 32 32 0 5 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1.000 0 53.0 229 207 61 7 7 0 15 0 0 17 0 0 24 22 4.08 3.74
1977 11 Fighters PL 33 61 0 22 0 0 0 0 7 4 4 0.636 6 13 112.1 446 411 96 7 6 7 19 8 3 78 0 0 36 29 2.88 2.32
1978 11 Fighters PL 34 57 0 42 2 0 0 0 12 11 8 0.522 10 22 130.2 530 480 125 12 7 5 29 9 9 59 0 0 54 44 3.72 3.03
1979 11 Fighters PL 35 45 0 30 0 0 0 0 5 3 4 0.625 11 16 98.2 419 371 101 16 11 1 30 5 6 42 1 0 50 46 4.56 4.20
1980 11 Fighters PL 36 37 0 20 0 0 0 0 2 3 5 0.400 2 4 67.0 294 247 70 12 8 7 28 3 4 31 0 0 39 35 5.24 4.70
1981 11 Fighters PL 37 17 0 5 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0.500 0 1 20.1 98 87 28 1 0 1 9 1 1 10 0 1 13 10 5.75 4.43
1982 11 Fighters PL 38 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 -.— 0 0 2.0 10 9 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 9.00 9.00
18 seasons 566 41 196 83 0 5 5 103 82 25 0.557 30 56 1642.1 6902 6158 1586 201 125 54 452 36 113 758 10 2 750 665 4.11 3.64
Hawks (10 seasons) 297 41 63 79 0 5 5 73 59 4 0.553 0 1139.0 4787 4268 1078 142 84 33 314 10 88 512 9 1 518 466 4.09 3.68
Fighters (7 seasons) 251 0 126 3 0 0 0 28 22 21 0.560 29 56 484.0 2026 1812 484 55 39 21 131 26 23 238 1 1 218 188 4.05 3.50
Tigers (1 seasons) 18 0 7 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0.667 1 19.1 89 78 24 4 2 0 7 0 2 8 0 0 14 11 6.52 5.12

From Japanese Baseball Database

Rob Fitts — a historian, award-winning author of “Banzai Babe Ruth” and Society of American Baseball Research (SABR) Asian Baseball Committee member — is now working on biography of Masanori Murakami, scheduled to be out Spring 2015. Can’t wait to read it.

More photos:
Murakami

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Ichiro, his 4,000th hits, Japanese stats, and discussions that followed

ichiro-kawasaki

Does Ichiro’s Japanese stats count? Ichiro after the hit, with Munenori Kawasaki who wore 52 in his honor (Ichiro was wearing 51 through his career till he got to New York, where he wears number 31) (AP Photo)

On Wednesday, August 21, 2013, Ichiro Suzuki of New York Yankees singled in the first inning in the Yankee Stadium for his 2,722th hit in MLB. The game was stopped, the fans gave them astanding ovation, and his Yankees teammates came out from the dugout to give him hugs.

That’s becuase combined with his 1,278 hits in Japan, that was his 4,000th “proffesional” hits.

This has generated some interesting discussions among fans around the baseball. One baseball email list that I subscribe, some people even started saying “Ichiro is overrated.” Because he doesn’t hit for power? Because they think hitting in Japanese League is a joke? I don’t know.

I personally think he is, even without Japanese stats, Hall of Fame worthy and indexes in Baseball-Reference.com and the awesome “Hall of Stats” seems to agree. The man has hit 2,722 hits in the Majors. That’s good enough for 59th all time, passing Lou Gehrig.

In Major League history, only Pete Rose (4,256 hits) and Ty Cobb (4,191) have hit more than 4,000. Rose, though he does think Ichiro should be headed to the Hall, says “When you compare yourself to me, Ty Cobb, Tris Speaker and Nap Lajoie, we all did it in the states.” He also says Ichiro will never be the all-time hit king. “If people consider him to have the record if he gets to 4,257 hits, I’ll come back and play if I’m reinstated. I’m sure even at my age I can hit a 15-hopper up the middle and crawl to first base for a hit.”

Perhaps it is a reaction to some of glowing appraise for Ichiro from the media, like: Ichiro joins select group with 4,000th hit (It is actually a very well written, fair story and falls under oversimplified headline problem) and ESPN’s Jim Caple’s The incomparable Ichiro’s 4,000 hits (Also very very good story).

But then, on the other side of Pacific, one writer even picks up on Joe Girardi’s comment “I didn’t have 4,000 hits in my entire career, and you can go back to tee ball” and say “They are comparing Japanese Baseball to kids Tee-Ball.” Which is completely false.

I think the true value of Ichiro’s accomplishment falls somewhere in between. I agree that mixing in stats from other league will lead to slippery slope, and some say they should separate stats from pre-integration of MLB, or include Negro League stats (This is hard because records are not as accurate). Similar argument also goes to Sadaharu Oh‘s world home run record of 868 (Played for Yomiuri Giants from 1959-80, MLB record is Barry Bonds’ 762), or lesser known record by Hideki Matsui, who played 1,250 consecutive games after joining the Yankees in 2003. He had a 518-game streak in Japan, and if combined, his 1,768 games would trail only Cal Ripken (2,632) and Lou Gehrig (2,130).

SABR’s Asian Basebal Committee, which I am part of, released this statement: “Despite the fact that sports historians and writers have debated the significance of Ichiro’s combined career hits on both sides of the Pacific, his 4,000 hits is an incredible record worth appreciating.”

At a recent SABR Asian Baseball Committee Meeting done over Teleconference/Webinar, Michael Westbay, who produce The Pro Yakyu Report podcast mentioned that his number of hits in Japan could/should translate to even more considering Japanese Baseball only play 130 games a season, compared to MLB’s 162. My friend and very talented data visualization guru Isao Matsunami who created this amazing visualization of pace of his hits by age, and points out that despite having 4,000 hits, his name is nowhere to be found when looking at NBP all time hits list (Ichiro’s 1,278 will not crack list of top 100, as 100th player Ken Hirano has 1,551 hits).

The best write up that I’ve seen so far may be Scott Simkus on SABR site. To Rose’s point earlier (“Hey, if we’re counting professional hits, then add on my 427 career hits in the minors. I was a professional then, too.”) He added all available hits together — MLB, Minor League, Pacific Coast League (Jigger Statz’ 3,356 hits), Cuban League, Mexican League, Negro League (Minnie Minoso for those three) and MLB post season games (Julio Franco, Derek Jeter).

Thus he created the all-time “professional” leaderboard:

  1. Pete Rose, 4,769
  2. Ty Cobb, 4,379
  3. Hank Aaron, 4,245
  4. Jigger Statz, 4,093
  5. Julio Franco, 4,074
  6. Minnie Minoso, 4,073
  7. Derek Jeter, 4,059
  8. Ichiro Suzuki, 4,027
  9. Stan Musial, 4,023

Note: Taken straight from here and this list may not be comprehensive.

That is an amazing, impressive research work.

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Check out the Limited Edition Commemorative Bat.

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Ichiro Suzuki’s Japanese stats in detail (1992-2000)

Yr Team Lg Age GP PA AB RS BH DB TP HR RBI TB SH SF SO BB IBB HBP SB CS GDP AVG OBP SLG OPS
1992 BlueWave PL 19 40 99 95 9 24 5 0 0 5 29 1 0 11 3 0 0 3 2 0 0.253 0.276 0.305 0.581
1993 BlueWave PL 20 43 67 64 4 12 2 0 1 3 17 1 0 7 2 0 0 0 2 2 0.188 0.212 0.266 0.478
1994 BlueWave PL 21 130 616 546 111 210 41 5 13 54 300 7 2 53 51 8 10 29 7 3 0.385 0.445 0.549 0.994
1995 BlueWave PL 22 130 613 524 104 179 23 4 25 80 285 0 3 52 68 17 18 49 9 7 0.342 0.432 0.544 0.976
1996 BlueWave PL 23 130 611 542 104 193 24 4 16 84 273 0 4 57 56 13 9 35 3 8 0.356 0.422 0.504 0.926
1997 BlueWave PL 24 135 607 536 94 185 31 4 17 91 275 0 5 36 62 14 4 39 4 10 0.345 0.414 0.513 0.927
1998 BlueWave PL 25 135 558 506 79 181 36 3 13 71 262 0 2 35 43 15 7 11 4 21 0.358 0.414 0.518 0.932
1999 BlueWave PL 26 103 468 411 80 141 27 2 21 68 235 0 5 46 45 15 7 12 1 5 0.343 0.412 0.572 0.984
2000 BlueWave PL 27 105 459 395 73 153 22 1 12 73 213 0 6 36 54 16 4 21 1 3 0.387 0.460 0.539 0.999
9 seasons 951 4098 3619 658 1278 211 23 118 529 1889 9 27 333 384 98 59 199 33 59 0.353 0.421 0.522 0.943

SOURCE

Here is the gif animation of the hit:
ichiro_4000_animated

And, also Ichiro congratulated Ken Griffey Jr. on his induction into the Mariners Hall of Fame in a video, which got a lot of tweets.

Couple more photos:
ichiro-4000-1 ichiro-4000-2

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Hisashi Iwakuma’s All-Star selection, and Japanese players and MLB All-Star game

iwakuma-darvish

Hisashi Iwakuma and Yu Darvish at All-Star Workout Day on July 15, 2013 at Citi Field.(Photo: Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

(This blogpost updates the list from a year ago: MLB All Star Game 2013. Hisashi Iwakuma and Yu Darvish. American League edged National League 3-0, with Yankees Rivera getting MVP award.

This is Darvish’s second selection to the All Star, and first time for Iwakuma. Iwakuma becomes the 10th Japanese player to be selected for All Star team. Darvish joins Ichiro, Hideki Matsui and Kazuhiro Sasaki for Japanese player selected multiple times.

List of 10 Japanese players that made MLB All Star team

  1. Hideo Nomo (Los Angeles Dodgers): 1995
  2. Ichiro Suzuki (Seattle Mariners): Ten times – 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010
  3. Kazuhiro Sasaki (Seattle Mariners): Twice – 2001, 2002
  4. Hideki Matsui (New York Yankees): Twice – 2003, 2004
  5. Shigetoshi Hasegawa (Seattle Mariners): 2003
  6. Takashi Saito (Los Angeles Dodgers): 2007
  7. Hideki Okajima (Boston Red Sox): 2007
  8. Kosuke Fukudome (Chicago Cubs): 2008
  9. Yu Darvish (Texas Rangers): Twice – 2012, 2013
  10. Hisashi Iwakuma (Seattle Mariners): 2013

Hisashi Iwakuma is having an amazing season. As of the All-Star break, he is leading American League in WHIP (Walks plus hits per inning pitched) with 0.94, good enough for third in the MLB (behind Clayton Kershaw of Dodgers with 0.91 and Met’s Matt Harvey, NL starter, 0.92). He is walking only 19 batters while strking out 113 in 131 and 1/3 innings. He has record of 8-4 with 3.02 ERA.

Last year, Yu Darvish was selected by fan’s “Final Vote”. But this year, he was selected by vote of the league’s players, managers, and coaches. He is 8-4 with 3.02 ERA (strange that it is exactly the same as Iwakuma at this point. I thought I messed it up), but leading the MLB with 157 strikeoiuts. Had he not be on DL, he could have started the All-Star game, which would have been first Japanese since Hideo Nomo started the game in 1995, his rookie year. Speaking of Nomo, his name was mentioned in this All-Star because NL Starter Matt Harvey, prior to starting the 2013 All-Star game, had only 29 major league starts, which is the fewest for an All-Star starter since Hideo Nomo with 13 (in 1995).

One more interesting facts about Darvish and All-Star. Darvish was selected twice but have not pitched in the game. There are a total of 22 pitchers have made a team twice without appearing in a game in MLB history according to Dallas Morning News’ Garry Fraley. Johnny “Grandma” Murphy is the only pitcher with three All-Star selections (1937-39) but no appearances.

Finally, Koji Uehara was on the ballot for MLB All-Star “Final Vote”. He finished distant 4th in the voting, but there were total of three Japanese players who was voted into All-Star since “Final Vote” got started in 2002: Hideki Matsui in 2004, Hideki Okajima in 2007 and Yu Darvish in 2012.

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Hideki Matsui and his ‘Sayonara’ home runs

Hideki-Matsui

Hideki Matsui hits a 2-run double in the bottom of the fifth inning in Game 6 of the 2009 MLB World Series at Yankee Stadium (Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)

Hideki Matsui called it a career yesterday, ending his great 20 years of professional baseball, ten in Japan, and another in MLB.
He played in total 2,504 games (1,268 in Japan, 1,236 in U.S.) hit 2,643 hits, 507 HRs, 1,649 RBI, with .293 batting average. (1,390 hits, 332 HR, 889 RBI, .304 in Japan, 2,643 hits, 175 HR, 760 RBI, and .282 BA in MLB. Source: Nikkan Sports)

With a nod to Ichiro Suzuki, who is in his own category and most likely headed for the Hall of Fame after he retires, Matsui was one of the best power hitters in Japan, and the most successful power hitter from Japan.

Number doesn’t lie. Here is the total number of home runs and RBI by JapaneseBallPlayers.

Player HR Season(s)
Hideki Matsui 175 10
Ichiro Suzuki 104 12
Kenji Johjima 48 4
Tadahito Iguchi 44 4
Kosuke Fukudome 42 4
Kazuo Matsui 32 6
Tsuyoshi Shinjo 20 3
So Taguchi 19 5
Akinori Iwamura 16 4
Norichika Aoki 10 1
Player RBI Season(s)
Hideki Matsui 760 10
Ichiro Suzuki 642 12
Kazuo Matsui 211 7
Tadahito Iguchi 205 4
Kenji Johjima 198 4
Kosuke Fukudome 195 5
So Taguchi 163 7
Akinori Iwamura 117 4
Tsuyoshi Shinjo 100 3
Norichika Aoki 50 1
Tsuyoshi Nishioka 20 2
Munenori Kawasaki 7 1
Norihiro Nakamura 3 1

Hits and Batting Averages? Obviously he doesn’t come close to Ichiro, but far better than other Japanese hitters.

Player Hits Season(s)
Ichiro Suzuki 2,606 12
Hideki Matsui 1,253 10
Kazuo Matsui 555 7
Kosuke Fukudome 498 5
Tadahito Iguchi 494 4
Kenji Johjima 431 4
Akinori Iwamura 413 4
So Taguchi 382 8
Tsuyoshi Shinjo 215 3
Norichika Aoki 150 1
Tsuyoshi Nishioka 50 2
Munenori Kawasaki 20 1
Norihiro Nakamura 5 1
Player AVG Season(s) (H/AB)
Ichiro Suzuki .322 12 (2,606/8,085)
Norichika Aoki .288 1 (150/520)
Hideki Matsui .282 10 (1,253/4,442)
So Taguchi .279 8 (382/1,369)
Tadahito Iguchi .268 4 (494/1,841)
Kenji Johjima .268 4 (431/1,609)
Akinori Iwamura .267 4 (413/1,545)
Kosuke Fukudome .258 5 (498/1,929)
Tsuyoshi Shinjo .245 3 (215/876)
Kazuo Matsui .241 7 (555/2,302)
Tsuyoshi Nishioka .215 2 (50/233)
Munenori Kawasaki .192 1 (20/104)
Norihiro Nakamura .128 1 (5/39)

But one of more interesting numbers about Matsui is how much of a clutch hitter that he was. Only four Japanese players — Matsui, Tadahito Iguchi, Ichiro Suzuki and Norichika Aoki — have hit walk-off home runs in the major league baseball thus far. Walk-off home run is known in Japan as “Sayonara” home run, as in “Game over, good bye.” Hideki Matsui have hit three “Sayonaras”, while others, Ichiro, Iguchi and Aoki each have hit one. That’s right, Matsui has three of the six walk-off home runs hit by Japanese players in the majors.

List of Walk-off home runs hit by Japanese Major Leaguers

As of conclusion of 2012 season

In 2011, as a member of Oakland Athletics, Hideki Matsui hit his third MLB walk-off home run in the 10th to beat the Rangers, on May 2, 2011.

May 2, against Texas Rangers. Off Darren Oliver in the 10th, with 0 out, the bases empty and the score tied at 4-4. Retrosheet Box

An article from Sankei Sports in Japan then reported that Matsui, with his 8 sayonara home runs (total combining 5 in Japan and 3 in the United States) passed Shigeo Nagashima and tied with Sadaharu Oh. According to an un-official personal research by Akichan, most Sayonara home run in Japanese History is held by Kazuhiro Kiyohara (12), followed by Katsuya Nomura (11) Norihiro Nakamura (10, a one-time Dodger, current Yokohama DeNA BayStars), and Oh and Tsutomu Wakamatsu (8).

Other two times were:

  • July 17, 2003 against Cleveland Indians. Off David Riske in 9th inning with 0 out, the bases empty and the score tied at 4-4. Retrosheet Box.
    This was the first Sayonara home run hit by a Japanese player in the history of MLB.
  • July 20, 2009 against Baltimore Orioles. Off Jim Johnson in the 9th inning with 1 out, the bases empty and the score tied at 1-1. Retrosheet Box

He also have 5 walk-off homers in 10 seasons in Japan, 1994, 1996, 2000(x2) and 2001.

*****

The second Sayonara home run hit by a Japanese player in MLB history came in 2008, by infielder Tadahito Iguchi, then playing for the San Diego Padres.

April 26, 2008 against the Arizona Diamondbacks. Off Yusmeiro Petit in 13th inning with 1 out, the bases empty and the score tied at 7-7. Retrosheet box.

Iguchi is currently playing for the Chiba Lotte Marines, and has hit 7 sayonara homers in Japan. Bringing his US-Japan total to 8, matching Matsui.

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Ichiro is an interesting case. He did not hit any walk-off hits in his first 8 seasons in MLB. But in 2009, he had three, and one of them came in a form of a Sayonara homer. Off of Mariano Rivera no less. The two run Sayonara blast made Felix Hernandez, who pitched a complete game, a winner. Ichiro does not have any walk-off home run in his 9 seasons in Japan.

Ichiro Suzuki playing for Seattle Mariners, on September 18, 2009 against the New York Yankees. Off Mariano Rivera in 9th inning with 2 outs, a runners on second and the score at 2-1. Retrosheet box.

*****

30-year old rookie outfielder Norichika Aoki of Milwaukee Brewers was the one to hit the latest walk-off home run, on June 7 this year. Aoki AND his translator experienced a big-league tradition, a shaving cream pie in the face.

June 7, 2012 against the Chicago Cubs. Off Casey Coleman in 10th inning with 0 out, the bases empty and the score tied at 3-3. Retrosheet box.

******

UPDATE: Ichiro Suzuki hits a walk-off home run on June 25, 2013 for the New York Yankees. His second in his MLB career. Ichiro delivered a walk-off home run off Tanner Scheppers, bottom 9th, 2 outs, nobody on. Game tied at 3-3.

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How Japanese closers fared in the Majors, and how will Kyuji Fujikawa do?

The latest news is that Hanshin Tigers closer Kyuji Fujikawa will excercise his international free agent rights and aim to jump to the major leagues (Official announcment in Japanese). In Japan, players earn rights to domestic free agency in 8 years (1160 days), and international free agency in 9 years (1305 days). UPDATE: Fujiakawa signed with the Chicago Cubs to a two year contract on December 7.

Fujikawa has asked to be posted in the past, but the Tigers front office did not want to lose him. He became eligible for international free agency during 2012 season.

In 12 seasons, 32-year-old Fujikawa has collected 220 saves and has a 1.77 ERA. 220 saves ranks him 5th in all time Japanese Career Saves leader.

Japanese Baseball Career Saves leader, as of the end of the 2012 season

  1. Hitoki Iwase 346 (1999–Present)
  2. Shingo Takatsu 286 (1991–2007)
  3. Kazuhiro Sasaski 252 (1990–2005)
  4. Masahide Kobayashi 228 (1999–2011)
  5. Kyuji Fujikawa 220 (2000–Present)
  6. Yutaka Enatsu 193 (1967–1984)
  7. Takahiro Mahara 180 (2004–Present)
  8. Marc Kroon 177 (2005–2010)
  9. Katsuhiro Nagakawa 164 (2003–2011 *Active but DNP in 2012)
  10. Kiyoshi Toyoda 157 (1995–2011)
  11. Motoyuiki Akahori 139 (1989–2004)
  12. Yutaka Ohno 138 (1977–1998)
  13. Akinori Otsuka 137 (1997–2003)
  14. Hisashi Takeda 134 (2003-Present)
  15. Akio Saito 133 (1977–1993)
  16. Yoshitaka Katori 131 (1979–1997)
  17. Kazuyuki Yamamoto 130 (1972–1988)
  18. Chang-Yong Lim 128 (2008–Present)
  19. Kazuhiko Ushijima 126 (1980–1993)
  20. Eddie Gaillard 120 (2000–2004)

Links go to English version of Nippon Proffesional Baseball website for active players, and for the past players, Michael Eng’s open source Japanese Baseball Database.

Interestingly, Six of the top 20 saves leaders played in MLB. Two are former MLB players jumped to the NPB (Kroon, Gaillard), but three out of top four (Takatsu, Sasaki, Kobayashi), all challeneged MLB hitters, to various success rate. Fujikawa will make this list a four of five.

Number of MLB saves by Japanese saves leaders

Links go to baseball-reference.com.

Others who are not in top saves leaders, Takashi Saito, Koji Uehara, Shiugetoshi Hasegawa, Hideki Irabu, Masanori Murakami, Hisanori Takahashi, Masao Kida, Hideki Okajima, Keiichi Yabu, Hisashi Iwakuma, Yoshinori Tateyama, Junichi Tazawa all closed games in the MLB.

Saves by Japanese players in the MLB, by year (as of end of the 2012 season)

  1. 45 (in 69 games) Kazuhiro Sasaki, 2001
  2. 39 (in 63 games) Takashi Saito, 2007
  3. 37 (in 63 games) Kazuhiro Sasaki, 2000
  4. 37 (in 61 games) Kazuhiro Sasaki, 2002
  5. 32 (in 63 games) Akinori Otsuka, 2006
  6. 24 (in 72 games) Takashi Saito, 2006
  7. 19 (in 59 games) Shingo Takatsu, 2004
  8. 18 (in 66 games) Shigetoshi Hasegawa, 2000
  9. 18 (in 45 games) Takashi Saito, 2008
  10. 17 (in 63 games) Shigetoshi Hasegawa, 2003
  11. 16 (in 38 games) Hideki Irabu, 2002
  12. 13 (in 43 games) Koji Uehara, 2010
  13. 10 (in 35 games) Kazuhiro Sasaki, 2003
  14. 8 (in 45 games) Masanori Murakami, 1965
  15. 8 (in 40 games) Shingo Takatsu, 2005
  16. 8 (in 53 games) Hisanori Takahashi, 2010
  17. 6 (in 46 games) Shigetoshi Hasegawa, 2001
  18. 6 (in 57 games) Masahide Kobayashi, 2008
  19. 5 (in 64 games) Shigetoshi Hasegawa, 1999
  20. 5 (in 53 games) Shigetoshi Hasegawa, 2002
  21. 5 (in 68 games) Shigetoshi Hasegawa, 2004
  22. 5 (in 66 games) Hideki Okajima, 2007
  23. 4 (in 34 games) Akinori Otsuka, 2007
  24. 2 (in 73 games) Akinori Otsuka, 2004
  25. 2 (in 56 games) Takashi Saito, 2009
  26. 2 (in 61 games) Hisanori Takahashi, 2011
  27. 2 (in 16 games) Hisashi Iwakuma, 2012
  28. 1 (in 9 games) Masanori Murakami, 1964
  29. 1 (in 49 games) Masao Kida, 1999
  30. 1 (in 12 games) Micheal Nakamura, 2003
  31. 1 (in 66 games) Akinori Otsuka, 2005
  32. 1 (in 40 games) Keiichi Yabu, 2005
  33. 1 (in 64 games) Hideki Okajima, 2008
  34. 1 (in 56 games) Takashi Saito, 2010
  35. 1 (in 39 games) Yoshinori Tateyama, 2011
  36. 1 (in 37 games) Koji Uehara, 2012
  37. 1 (in 37 games) Junichi Tazawa, 2012

So how will Kyuji Fujikawa do? This is completely my own opinion but I am cautiously optimistic about Fujikawa’s success in the MLB. He has high strikeout number, career 11.88 K/9 (914 strikeouts in 692.1 innings) and high strikeouts to walk ration, 4.42 K/BB (914 strikeouts while walking 207 batters). Those are very impressive numbers.

On the other hand, as he is a power pitcher, it is a little concerning that Fujikawa’s fastball velocity is declining, as you can see in NPB Tracker’s player data of Kyuji Fujikawa. (By the way, if you have not seen Patrick Newman-san’s work, you have to check it out. It is AMAZING. You can see any player sine 2009.)

Fujikawa’s fastball velocity averages:
2009: 92.60
2010: 93.60
2011: 91.91
2012: 91.59

But he still gets batters out mixing in his forkball and sliders. Perhaps he is not at the top of his career, but he could still be effective in the majors.

One thing that I always remember about Fujikawa is that he was the pitcher who were on the mound when team Japan lost to the team United States in 2006 World Baseball Classic in the 9th inning, an RBI single by Alex Rodriguez. It is the infamous “Bob Davidson game” and it featured many future Japanese MLB players as Tsuyoshi Nishioka, Kosuke Fukudome, Akinori Iwamura, Norichika Aoki, Munenori Kawasaki, Koji Uehara (who pitched a brilliant game), Yasuhiko Yabuta and now Kyuji Fujikawa (in addition to Ichiro).

Key Stats of Kyuji Fujikawa

Year G W L SV IP H HR BB HB SO WP R ER ERA K/9 K/BB
2000 19 0 0 0 22.2 25 1 18 4 25 4 15 12 4.76 9.84 1.39
2002 12 1 5 0 68.0 56 6 30 2 64 4 33 28 3.71 8.47 2.13
2003 17 1 1 0 29.1 28 4 12 1 19 2 12 11 3.38 5.81 1.58
2004 26 2 0 0 31.0 26 3 11 2 35 0 10 9 2.61 10.16 3.18
2005 80 7 1 1 92.1 57 5 20 1 139 5 20 14 1.36 13.53 6.95
2006 63 5 0 17 79.1 46 3 22 0 122 5 6 6 0.68 13.82 5.55
2007 71 5 5 46 83.0 50 2 18 1 115 2 15 15 1.63 12.47 6.39
2008 63 8 1 38 67.2 34 2 13 3 90 3 6 5 0.67 11.94 6.92
2009 49 5 3 25 57.2 32 4 15 1 86 0 9 8 1.25 13.38 5.73
2010 58 3 4 28 62.2 47 7 20 5 81 1 14 14 2.01 11.60 4.05
2011 56 3 3 41 51.0 25 2 13 1 80 3 9 7 1.24 14.12 6.15
2012 48 2 2 24 47.2 34 1 15 1 58 2 7 7 1.32 10.91 3.87
Total 562 42 25 220 692.1 460 40 207 22 914 31 156 136 1.77 11.88 4.42
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